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Sashimi

Sashimi. You Have to Know How to Cut It.

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Today we are not going to make a recipe. This article is meant to give several points of recommendation for how to cut fish and prepare good sashimi. Especially now that the holiday season has begun and we’re all after new tricks for our houseguests. The first thing is to have a good knife at home. Perhaps take advantage of a good deal, (like this offer) and remember the golden rule: a good knife is better than 15 bad ones. The edge is not everything. It is also about the craftsmanship of the knife and the material that it is made out of. Truthfully, I have always preferred Shun knives.

How to Cut Fish to Make Sashimi.

The first point, as I told you, is to check your knives. Next comes the time to select the fish. The best favor you can give yourself is to find a trusted provider in your local market. If you live in a big city, always look for someone that is a known provider to chefs and restaurants. Go to the supply centers. Check the markets. If you live in a city on the coast, then the best advice is to have a fisherman friend.

Sashimi


The most important factor to consider is the freshness. So the tricks remain the same as for all fresh products. Check the smell. Look at the eyes. Check the firmness of the flesh. If you are getting a whole fish, you will have to fillet it first and remove the thorns. So it’s important to have a knife and a cutting board.

Remember that it is best to avoid mixing products, so you should have a cutting board dedicated to cutting only fish, another for red meat, one for poultry, and another for vegetables.

In order to cut sashimi, you should use an incredibly sharp knife and cut all in one movement. Once you make the first slice, you have continue in one single movement from the bottom of the knife and make one long cut until the piece of sashimi is ready.

What fish are you using? That will depend on your taste. You can use almost anything from the sea. Octopus, shrimp, salmon (but not Chilean), tuna, hamachi, sea bass… get excited and explore healthier and lighter foods.

¿More recipes? Here, go wild with our recipe section!

About Carlos Dragonné

Cineasta, escritor y cocinero. Sufro de analisistis aguda, con cuadros de humor negro crónico recurrente. Músico con un piano cerca. Reconstructor de fantasías

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